Paul Ruffin Dead at 74

Paul Ruffin, 2009 Texas State Poet Laureate, Texas State University System Regents’ professor and Sam Houston State University’s distinguished professor of English, died at his home in Montgomery County on Wednesday, April 13. He was 74.

Ruffin was founder and Editor-in-Chief of the Texas Review, an international literary journal, and Texas Review Press. He was a member of the Texas A&M University Press Consortium.

He was also active in TACWT and other creative writing organizations.

His career included the publication of more than 1,500 poems, 100-plus stories, and more than 90 essays in magazines and journals. His work has appeared in numerous anthologies and textbooks. He wrote a weekly column that appeared in several newspapers in Texas and Mississippi.

His most recent book, published last November, is “The Time the Waters Rose and Stories of the Gulf Coast.” An article in SHSU’s 2009 alumna magazine, Heritage, described Ruffin as loving football, shooting, riding his tractor, maintaining his truck and doing his own carpentry, electric, and plumbing work.

Former SHSU English Department Chair Bill Bridges said the substantial work Ruffin did in building The Texas Review and Texas Review Press from the mid-’70s made them a well- respected cache of literary work.

“His contributions as an editor, publisher, writer and poet will be missed in Texas and throughout the South,” Baylor ASAT member Dr. Cassy Burleson said.

Sarah Cortez, author of “Vanishing Points” (2016), added that Ruffin was a champion of literary writers with polished voices and stylistic integrity within genres.

“Once Paul. trusted your ‘writerly’ judgment, he trusted your judgment,” she said. “Many people chose to dislike Paul.”

Cortez added “That’s too bad because he had flawless taste and was a brilliant writer in his own right.”

Ruffin is survived by his wife Amber and his three children.

and doing his own carpentry, electric, and plumbing work.

Former SHSU English Department Chair Bill Bridges said the substantial work Ruffin did in building The Texas Review and Texas Review Press from the mid-’70s made them a well- respected cache of literary work.

“His contributions as an editor, publisher, writer and poet will be missed in Texas and throughout the South,” Baylor ASAT member Dr. Cassy Burleson said.

Sarah Cortez, author of “Vanishing Points” (2016), added that Ruffin was a champion of literary writers with polished voices and stylistic integrity within genres.

“Once Paul. trusted your ‘writerly’ judgment, he trusted your judgment,” she said. “Many people chose to dislike Paul.”

Cortez added “That’s too bad because he had flawless taste and was a brilliant writer in his own right.”

Ruffin is survived by his wife Amber and his three children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His career included the publication of more than 1,500 poems, 100-plus stories, and more than 90 essays in magazines and journals. His work has appeared in numerous anthologies and textbooks. He wrote a weekly column that appeared in several newspapers in Texas and Mississippi.

His most recent book, published last November, is “The Time the Waters Rose and Stories of the Gulf Coast.” An article in SHSU’s 2009 alumna magazine, Heritage, described Ruffin as loving football, shooting, riding his tractor, maintaining his truck

 

and doing his own carpentry, electric, and plumbing work.

Former SHSU English Department Chair Bill Bridges said the substantial work Ruffin did in building The Texas Review and Texas Review Press from the mid-’70s made them a well- respected cache of literary work.

“His contributions as an editor, publisher, writer and poet will be missed in Texas and throughout the South,” Baylor ASAT member Dr. Cassy Burleson said.

Sarah Cortez, author of “Vanishing Points” (2016), added that Ruffin was a champion of literary writers with polished voices and stylistic integrity within genres.

“Once Paul. trusted your ‘writerly’ judgment, he trusted your judgment,” she said. “Many people chose to dislike Paul.”

Cortez added “That’s too bad because he had flawless taste and was a brilliant writer in his own right.”

Ruffin is survived by his wife Amber and his three children.

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Author:

The founder of Critical Studies Blog, Mia Moody-Ramirez, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of journalism, public relations and new media at Baylor University. She specializes in new media portrayals of women and people of color. Her recent papers focus on the effects of the James Byrd Jr. dragging death on Jasper, Facebook hate groups, stereotypes of President Barack and Michelle Obama, male and female rappers’ differing views on the “independent woman,” and coverage of missing women.

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